Save The Planarians

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The Tipsy Rabbit

cyborgrobotsquirrels:

One evening during an all-night blacklighting gig, Velociraptor tripped over a rabbit.  Thinking this was a bit odd, she took a closer look and realized that the rabbit seemed unable to balance.  Every time it tried to run, it could only flop onto its side while its legs kicked uselessly. 

Velociraptor showed the rabbit to Snipe, and they theorized that a) the rabbit had suffered a head injury, b) the rabbit had some sort of debilitating disease, or b) the rabbit had somehow gotten into one of the pans of ethanol that had been left out to collect bugs, and was now drunk.

Resisting the temptation to take home the probably-parasite-ridden animal and try to nurse it back to health, Velociraptor made the rabbit comfortable in a sheltered patch of weeds.  If it had a head injury, there was nothing she could do; if it was diseased, it was a bad idea to take it back to the cabin; and if it had a drinking problem, it just needed to decide for itself to face its alcoholism.

About two weeks later, Snipe and Velociraptor were heading along the same path to the blacklighting site, when a rabbit flopped out of the path in front of them.  Struggling to its feet, it managed to flop to safety in the undergrowth.

Snipe:  It’s the floppy bunny!

Velociraptor:  It’s the tipsy rabbit!

Snipe:  The floppy bunny has survived!

Velociraptor:  Either that, or it’s not the same rabbit, and there’s a debilitating disease among the rabbit population that causes these symptoms.

Snipe:  Yeah, but I would rather assume it’s the same floppy bunny.  It’s happier.

Velociraptor…

Snipe:  I like happy things.

Filed under lab adventures the floppy bunny

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kqedscience:

The CPR We Don’t See on TV
“Some have suggested that misrepresentations of CPR on television may lead patients to have unrealistic expectations of what the procedure entails and the likelihood of success. Survival rates for patients receiving CPR on popular, prime-time medical TV shows have traditionally been much higher than in the real world. One study found that 75 percent of TV patients who receive CPR are alive immediately after, and 67 percent of patients survive in the long term. Other research has shown that though recent shows like “Grey’s Anatomy” have more accurate immediate survival rates, they are still misleading.”
Read more from The Well blog at the nytimes.

Everything about this bothers me, all the time.  Doctors performing CPR and bringing people back to life with a cough and a gasp and no brain damage.  Doctors defibrillating when there’s no detectable rhythm.  Doctors doing compressions so shallow that the chest doesn’t even move, much less the heart.  It fills me with despair.  Like, really, is that so hard to get right?  Please.  One time.

kqedscience:

The CPR We Don’t See on TV

Some have suggested that misrepresentations of CPR on television may lead patients to have unrealistic expectations of what the procedure entails and the likelihood of success. Survival rates for patients receiving CPR on popular, prime-time medical TV shows have traditionally been much higher than in the real world. One study found that 75 percent of TV patients who receive CPR are alive immediately after, and 67 percent of patients survive in the long term. Other research has shown that though recent shows like “Grey’s Anatomy” have more accurate immediate survival rates, they are still misleading.”

Read more from The Well blog at the nytimes.

Everything about this bothers me, all the time.  Doctors performing CPR and bringing people back to life with a cough and a gasp and no brain damage.  Doctors defibrillating when there’s no detectable rhythm.  Doctors doing compressions so shallow that the chest doesn’t even move, much less the heart.  It fills me with despair.  Like, really, is that so hard to get right?  Please.  One time.

(via scinerds)

Filed under science biology medicine cpr

4,513 notes

archiemcphee:

The Existential Coloring Book is packed to the gills with animal-people paired with dark quotes from philosophers and other people worried about the essential dark unknowability of the universe. Also, activities! From an existential connect-the-dots to a page where you can draw what Kierkegaard is thinking about, you’ll being sighing with joy as you work on them. This looks like a coloring book for kids, but it’s probably not a good idea to give it to one. This twenty-four page, 8” x 10-1/4” book is a great gift for philosophy majors or anyone else overwhelmed with a feeling of hopelessness. Features quotes from existential thinkers, mysterious pictures to color and mildly depressing activities.

Buy one here

(via wilwheaton)

Filed under i want them! this is so great philosophy post-modern philosophy coloring books

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In which Velociraptor continues to struggle

cyborgrobotsquirrels:

Summer is nearing its end, and Velociraptor and Snipe have departed the BioStation to spend a week at their respective homes before heading back to college.  On Sunday, Velociraptor was at her home church, where she was cornered by the endlessly talkative, smothering-yet-sincere older lady who has apparently ”adopted” her.  For our purposes, she will be known as Mrs. Butterfly.

Mrs. Butterfly: I know how your mom feels, with you being gone so often!  I was sobbing at the airport when my own daughter left.

(Velociraptor vaguely recalled that Mrs. Butterfly’s daughter had gone to Latin America in some sort of medical capacity, but failed to remember any details.  She tried to look sympathetic but probably only succeeded in looking pained.)

Mrs. Butterfly: Of course, if I had known what was going to happen, it would have been even worse!

Velociraptor: (slightly panicked, since she was probably supposed to know this story already)  Why?  What happened?

Mrs. Butterfly: Well, she got parasites, and the doctors didn’t know how to treat -

Velociraptor: *enthusiastically*  Really?  What kind?

Velociraptor’s Appropriate Response Program:  You moron.  That’s the wrong thing to say.

Mrs. Butterfly: *slightly confused* Oh, I don’t know.  It was in her intestines, you know.

Velociraptor: Oh, that’s cool.

Velociraptor’s Appropriate Response Program: ABORT ABORT

Velociraptor: Oops, looks like it’s time to go, see you later, hope your daughter… feels better… *hurries away*

Velociraptor’s Appropriate Response Program: *sarcastic slow clap*

You’ve got to delete the Appropriate Response Program from all your subroutines.  Trust me.  People will adapt.  Like, for a little bit, they’ll be weirded out.  But then people you barely know will start bringing you squashed frogs and deer bones and dead bugs, and your collection of specimens will expand SO MUCH, and most people will stop being surprised that you have a favorite parasite.  And, yes, you will occasionally be shoe-horned into a category in people’s brains reserved for small children and that man who wanders around the public park talking to himself.  But that is ok.  Better to confuse a few people than deny yourself the opportunity to be excited about things you love.  And truly, most people adapt.

Filed under and the ones who don't adapt are EVEN MORE FUN because they cannot cope with your very existence and my gosh can you ever use that to your advantage also it's a very parsimonious way of finding people you actually want to hang out with lab adventures

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A Doctor Who-Themed Restaurant

Filed under doctor who food