Save The Planarians

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Deadpool Classic, Volume 4

Blind Albert:
Back in my heyday, during the big one ... I saw some action overseas. Met a lot of boys on the front...
Blind Al:
... Helmet straps biting into cheeks still round with baby fat ... some hardly smart enough to duck, but there anyways, fighting Hitler in his backyard ...
Blind Al:
One of the boys ... called him "Blondie", he was what you'd think of as a real hero ... always throwing himself on top of grenades and such.
Me:
Oh my gosh, Blind Al used to know Captain America.
Blind Al:
This was his ... he gave it to me in Moscow ... the last time we saw one another. We were close. One time I ask him what it felt like to be a newsreel darling ... a bona fide hero. He looked at me with those eyes that were always bright and sad at the same time
Me:
Oh that is totally Captain America.
Blind Al:
and said: "I'm not a hero. I'm just a guy who tried to do the right thing ... and didn't get shot in the process."
Me:
Please let this be a thing. Please let Blind Al and Steve Rogers be a thing.
Deadpool:
But how can I try ... when I'm scared ... that I'm not good enough to pull it off? "Blondie" ever talk about that?
Blind Al:
When we were alone together ... holding one another, trembling in the dark ... it was all he ever talked about.
Me:
YESSS!

Filed under I ended up with a lot of emotions about deadpool at the end of volume 4 because he wanted to be a hero so bad and Cap showed up and Deadpool just wanted to let Cap make the call because he knew that at least Cap had a flawless moral compass but Deadpool has to do it and he saves the world and no one remembers and everyone still thinks he's a loser and a bad guy even though he's done this whole moral transformation thing AUGH (who knew books with pictures could be so emotionally taxing?) deadpool although also I hope Peggy Carter or Sharon Carter or whoever she is in the comic 'verse didn't know about Steve and Althea (which was apparently what she went by before 'Albert') because I feel like Ms. Carter would not appreciate that very much

105,146 notes

branwyn-says:

thelithiumcat:

thehopefulbluestocking:

marzipanandminutiae:

hiswonderlandprince:

ohmickeymomo:

fakevermeer:




Test Your Vocabulary: how many words do you know?


Most Native English adult speakers who have taken the test fall in the range 20,000–35,000 words. And for foreign learners of English, we’ve found that the most common vocabulary size is from 2,500–9,000 words.
I scored 21,500 FUCK YES


I got 32,800 WOAH

27,800 words

41,000

36 800

27,700

38,000! 

32,400.  Yay for being average in my demographic!

branwyn-says:

thelithiumcat:

thehopefulbluestocking:

marzipanandminutiae:

hiswonderlandprince:

ohmickeymomo:

fakevermeer:

Test Your Vocabulary: how many words do you know?

Most Native English adult speakers who have taken the test fall in the range 20,000–35,000 words. And for foreign learners of English, we’ve found that the most common vocabulary size is from 2,500–9,000 words.

I scored 21,500 FUCK YES

I got 32,800 WOAH

27,800 words

41,000

36 800

27,700

38,000! 

32,400.  Yay for being average in my demographic!

(Source: scipsy)

Filed under vocabulary words vocabulary test

23,784 notes

illustratedkate:

A while ago I got a message requesting something related to this tweet from ssspock (who runs the official_bucky account on Twitter)! It took me forever, but this is what I came up with! This was good fun to draw, and as you can see Bucky’s twitter account is a true blessing so you should follow it (if you aren’t already!)

P.S. don’t forget to enter my art giveaway! It ends in a week!

(via wilwheaton)

Filed under pretending like there's going to be some kind of happiness in the next Captain America movie instead of death and tragedy helps me cope (because there is going to be so much death and tragedy) Bucky Barnes

287 notes

rhamphotheca:


New to Google Earth: Ancient Flying Reptiles
by Stephanie Pappas
Want to find the nearest pterosaur? There’s an app for that — or a database, at least.
A newly developed website catalogs more than 1,300 specimens of extinct flying reptiles called pterosaurs, thus enabling users to map out the ancient creatures on Google Earth. The goal is to help researchers find trends in the evolution and diversity of these ancient winged reptiles…
(read more: Live Science)
image: Thalassodromeus sethi, ©AMNH 2014

rhamphotheca:

New to Google Earth: Ancient Flying Reptiles

by Stephanie Pappas

Want to find the nearest pterosaur? There’s an app for that — or a database, at least.

A newly developed website catalogs more than 1,300 specimens of extinct flying reptiles called pterosaurs, thus enabling users to map out the ancient creatures on Google Earth. The goal is to help researchers find trends in the evolution and diversity of these ancient winged reptiles

(read more: Live Science)

image: Thalassodromeus sethi, ©AMNH 2014

(via scinerds)

Filed under science biology paleontology dionsaurs google earth

445,685 notes

righteouskungfu:

dersely:

momlonde:

do you ever see a photograph of someone really attractive from like the 1800s and you suddenly get pissed because they’ve been dead for like 200 years and you probably don’t have a chance with them

“probably”

"We have to go back"

image

This happens with my sister every time she sees a photograph of our maternal grandfather, who died in his thirties.  

"Look at Grandpa Irwin!  He was so attractive.”

(via merrilypippin)